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Yung Ho Chang: In-situ architecture: a Chinese practice (February 20, 2002)01:10:10

Yung Ho Chang explains, “architecture is site specific, thus always in-situ. He asks, “how can architecture be more in-situ?” Among his own projects, he discusses the renovation of a building in China in which glass boxes make offices and people inside visible from the sidewalk. He shows a hillside residential design with farming terraces and talks about topography. Chang describes a project at Peking University as “our version of SCI-Arc” because of its long narrow design. He explains his firm’s development of artificial terrain in order to bring back land that was flattened by developers. Chang discusses Tectonics showing construction work from his students at Peking University. Chang shows a house made of rammed earth and laminated plywood, and a current project for a 130 unit housing project. He asks, “Can we be so basic?” in terms of the concepts he has discussed. He talks about experiments with “bamboo as infrastructure.” Chang asks, “If there is no contemporary Chinese city, how can we have contemporary Chinese architecture?” He shows photographs of a large-scale urban project curreaYung Ho Chang explains, “architecture is site specific, thus always in-situ. He asks, “how can architecture be more in-situ?” Among his own projects, he discusses the renovation of a building in China in which glass boxes make offices and people inside visible from the sidewalk. He shows a hillside residential design with farming terraces and talks about topography. Chang describes a project at Peking University as “our version of SCI-Arc” because of its long narrow design. He explains his firm’s development of artificial terrain in order to bring back land that was flattened by developers. Chang discusses Tectonics showing construction work from his students at Peking University. Chang shows a house made of rammed earth and laminated plywood, and a current project for a 130 unit housing project. He asks, “Can we be so basic?” in terms of the concepts he has discussed. He talks about experiments with “bamboo as infrastructure.” Chang asks, “If there is no contemporary Chinese city, how can we have contemporary Chinese architecture?” He shows photographs of a large-scale urban project currently under construction, and a town plan which integrates water into various designs and buildings currently under construction, and a town plan which integrates water into various designs and buildings.